Film Review: Warcraft: The Beginning

This article was first published to The Edge on 12th June 2016

It’s incredibly easy to spot the difference between a film which makes big strides in the name of a studio’s cynical interests, and one where risks are taken by a truly talented filmmaker straining his every muscle to create something special under the weight of studio expectations. Duncan Jones’ third directorial feature is exactly in line with the latter category – his determination and vision in creating the Orcs in Warcraft: The Beginning alone, is the sort of landmark for CGI and motion capture that would be impossible to find in another director’s stab at this material. Continue reading

Film Review: Race

This article was originally published to The Edge on 9th June 2016

There’s a true, convincing love story at the heart of this biopic; but it isn’t the one between Jesse Owens (Stephan James) and Ruth Solomon (Shanice Banton). It’s the one between Owens and his coach Larry Snyder (Jason Sudeikis). Buoyed by immensely charismatic, emotional and empathetic performances from the two, the relationship grows as many coach-player relationships do in sports movies: from an aloof coach with the optimistic, often outsider player, into mutual respect and then a true friendship. It’s standard stuff, but at its best Race makes it work like gangbusters. By the halfway mark, as coach and runner make the Transatlantic voyage to Berlin for the Olympics, a small gesture by Snyder to stay below deck with Owens cements their bond. In fact, it’s something of a surprise that both men can make it through the events of the film without actually kissing. Continue reading

Review: Noises Off at the Nuffield Theatre

This article was originally published to The Edge on 8th June 2016

Explosions and physical comedy surpass language barriers. While Noises Off contains no explosions, for almost all of Act 2 of Michael Frayn’s farce, there is some of the best, most complex physical comedy to be seen on stage. It’s at this point that the play reaches its apex – while the rest of it, for me, proves how different types of comedy appeals different people.

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